Inspiring Blogger

Pheme has been, as luck would have it, quite a golden companion of mine the pas few weeks: I was told how “lovely” Madame looks through the Liebster Lauds and have been awarded a prize for her beguiling versatility… only to enhance the row of esteems bottom right with an extra nomination for the “Very Inspiring Blogger” that Liz back at “The Pragmatic Costumer” found fit to bestow upon yours truly. Somewhere in the higher spheres a providential creature has mysteriously decided on helping me… no reason in sight.

But returning to things rather more mundane, the award’s canonic laws:

 Thou shall display the award and link back to the person who nominated you.
Thou shall state 7 facts about yourself.
Thou shall nominate 15 bloggers for the award (in other words, be a philanthropist).
Thou shall notify the winners.

My random 7

1. I’m not far from being a sociopath.

2. The sole literary/ historical character I’ve actually managed to fall in love with is Homer’s Achilles (and yes, prior to Brad Pitt).

3. I’m both a gourmand and a gourmet… currently on diet for a Charlize Theron (or Sissi) figure.

4. If Hannibal Lecter were a real-life character I’d definitely be his disciple… for the sake of psychology.

5. By far the best movie seen this current month was “Carnage”.

6. My e-book “Vicious” is going to be launched next week.

7. Also, on Wednesday, I’m scheduled to pay a visit to a certain royal whose identity I’ll divulge in a future blog-post.

My 15 meritorious nominees

1. Tiaras and Trianon

2. Uncovering the Faces of History

3. Saints, Sisters and Sluts

4.Edwardian Promenade

5.Cafe Royal

6.Team Gloria

7.WTF Art History

8.Education of Madame X

9.Les Favorites Royale

10.Empress Chronicles

11.Knotty Puppet

12.The Freelance History Writer

13. Hankering for History

14.French Painters

15. the Mind is a Metaphor

Hail quality blogging!

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Versatile Blogger Award

Back when Madame was a mere beginner in blogging, “Versatile” and the “Kreativ Blogger” distinction were the first she’d ever aspired to. Surely, along the way, the debonair lady of this site acquired a few others she hadn’t previously heard of, like the “Liebster Lauds“, “Lovely Blog” or “Blog of the Year 2012” (forgive the exceeding repetition of the word “blog” which apparently all awards contain…) but never ceased to hope she’ll one day seize those honors initially desired.

Ironically, it is a namesake of mine that bestowed upon Madame the coveted laurels: Patricia Jordan (http://westcoastlivingcanada.com/) , passionate photographer, writer and traveler whom I thank for the esteem.

And now, having passed through the introductions to more pragmatic matters, the VBA rules:

  1.  Thank the person who gave you this award. That’s common courtesy.
  2.  Include a link to their blog. That’s also common courtesy.
  3.  Next, select 15 blogs/bloggers that you’ve recently discovered or follow regularly. ( I would add, pick blogs or bloggers that are excellent!)
  4.  Include a link to the mother-site: Versatile Blogger.
  5.  Finally, tell the person who nominated you 7 things about yourself.

Nominations

(in a perfectly random manner as not the divulge any preference) 

  1. Tiaras and Trianon
  2. the Pragmatic Costumer
  3. Empress Chronicles
  4. Life Takes Lemons
  5.  Saints, Sisters and Sluts
  6. Team Gloria
  7.  Splatter
  8. Sifting the Past
  9.  Good Gentlewomen
  10.  Versailles Gossip
  11. Cafe Royal
  12. Education of Madame X
  13. Les Favorites Royale
  14. Edwardian Promenade
  15. WTF Art History

7 Things about Myself

  1. I’m the proud master of a miniature Schnauzer imaginatively called Nyx after the Greek goddess of night… because she’s black.
  2. I’m a decided bibliophile who also owns 3 over 100 years-old books… and works to increase the number.
  3. I’ve never genuinely been in love with anything but art… and myself. Save some cursory infatuations.
  4. My personal verb is “to be“.
  5. I’m an INTJ of a psychological profile similar to Hannibal Lecter’s.
  6. I’m a dedicated admirer of all novels Salman Rushdie.
  7. I’m decisively myself… since everybody else is already taken.

FIN

One could never guess what genuinely amusing event devoid of any anticipation turned Wagner’s  Tannhäuser  première in a complete fiasco. It is the prerogative of the haughty19th century Parisian aristocracy to surprise both poor Richard, the contemporary and modern auditory with a reaction that changed the faith of an opera now considered one of Wagner’s best.

Facts are comically of an elementary character.

On this very day, 13 March 1861, the Salle Le Peletier was meant to host the first representation of Tannhäuser in France after exhausting months spent with a consuming number of over 160 thorough  rehearsals  which Wagner never failed to attend given that he was exceedingly keen to impress the public. A public composed from such characters as Emperor Napoleon III and Pauline von Metternich one cannot simply afford to disappoint.

And with the dozens of preparations undertaken, it shouldn’t have been the case . In fact, everything was arranged  for Wagner to repute a success.

But what actually happened?

Here’s the account almighty Wikipedia gives:

Wagner had originally hoped the Parisian première would take place at the Théâtre Lyrique. However, the première was at the Paris Opéra, so the composer had to insert a ballet into the score, according to the traditions of the house. Wagner agreed to this condition since he believed that a success at the Opéra represented his most significant opportunity to re-establish himself following his exile from Germany. Yet rather than put the ballet in its usual place in Act II, he chose to place it in Act I, where it could at least make some dramatic sense by representing the sensual world of Venus’s realm.

This midget alteration of the custom gave way to a veritable disaster.

There was a serious planned assault on the opera’s reception by members of the wealthy and aristocratic Jockey Club. Their habit was to arrive at the Opéra only in time for the Act II ballet, after previously dining, and, as often as not, to leave when the ballet was over. They objected to the ballet coming in Act I, since this meant they would have to be present from the beginning of the opera. Furthermore, they disliked Princess von Metternich, who had arranged the performance, and her native country of Austria.’ [any recall of the French revolution, anybody? any analogy to the way they treated Marie Antoinette? or perhaps your mind  goes back to the Vienna Congress in 1815?]

Club members led barracking from the audience with whistles and cat-calls. At the third performance on 24 March, this uproar caused several interruptions of up to fifteen minutes at a time. As a consequence, Wagner withdrew the opera after the third performance.This marked the end to Wagner’s hopes of establishing himself in Paris, at that time the center of the operatic world.

In a nutshell, this is the story of how a genius was ruined by frivolous manners.

Le Bal Black & White

1966: Truman Capote, prodigious writer much celebrated on his mother-continent,  throws a party that instantly has him conquer the lavish high society worldwide, a ball whose promise of superlatives makes invitations paramount concerns of elites across both America and Europe (no wonder he gathered 5 thousand friends but gained 15 thousand enemies when anyone known as someone vied for a possibility to attend).

The New York Plaza Hotel, meticulously decorated, reaches its zenith.

After a period of seclusion dedicated to laborious preparations, Capote returns with repetitive “I’m beside myself! Beside myself!” to take it over and welcome the masqued guests nevertheless recognized by the photographs galore who fenced in the red carpet.

party

Glittering names as those of Frank Sinatra, Cecil Beaton, Mia Farrow, Jacqueline de Ribes, Oscar de la Renta, Marlene Dietrich, Maharajah and Maharani of Jaipur,  Vivien Leigh, Shirley MacLaine,Baroness Cecile de Rothschild, Baron and Baroness Guy de Rothschild, Mr and Mrs John Steinbeck, Andy Warhol, Tennessee Williams and even the expatriated Duke and Duchess of Windsor figured on the privileged guest list. It was indeed the egocentric celebration of a silver age, a kaleidoscope of savory juxtapositions of class, titles, secular manners and social status to garrison the last remnants of decadence.

Half the Hall of Fame and Best Dressed list attended Capote’s hubristic feast in the most mesmerizing costumes possible (note: I’m far from resorting to hyperbole for that depiction)…

If in Truman’s shoes, is there anyone you would’ve coveted to see there but was not, caught in various circumstances, able to come?

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